Biography - Samuel Bouscher

SAMUEL BOUSCHER. In giving their just dues to the pioneers of southern lllnois, the pen of an historian is needed to perpetuate their names and deeds for posterity, who with the onward march of time will learn to appreciate them at their full value. It is doubtful if those sturdy characters themselves realized the magnitude of the work they had begun and the results which were to follow. Not only did their labors affect themselves personally, but the works of each man contributed to make a grand whole in the development of a rich section of the country, which is looked upon with pride by the people to-day. The fact that Mr. Bouscher came to Somerset Township prior to the founding of the city of Murphysboro is sufficient to establish him among the prominent men of Jackson County, and the further fact that he has labored industriously and lived worthily forms for him one of the most enduring monuments that can be erected to man.
The parents of our subject, Henry and Elizabeth (Wright) Bouscher, were natives of Pennsylvania, and were of German descent. Samuel was born in Somerset County, Pa., February 28, 1814, and was reared to manhood in the Keystone State, having from childhood engaged in agricultural pursuits. In the subscription schools of the home neighborhood he received a rudimentary education, and the knowledge there gained has since been supplemented by extensive reading and close observation. In October, 1838, in Pennsylvania, he was united in marriage with Miss Catherine Enos, who was born in Somerset County, that state, being a daughter of George and Catherine Enos. A large family of children resulted from this union, of whom the following survive: Mary A., wife of Daniel Kimmel; Ava A., who married G. G. Will (see sketch presented on another page); William H.; Emma F., wife of Edward Whipkey; Albina, who married Joseph Imhoff; and Alpheretta, wife of D. Bradley.
In 1839, accompanied by his family, Mr. Bouscher came to Illinois, and two years later he settled upon his present farm. After building a log cabin he commenced the work of clearing the land, which he developed until it was under excellent cultivation. He now owns a valuable farm consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, underlaid with coal; also two hundred and forty acres in Levan Township, and one hundred acres on Cedar Creek. As an agriculturist he has been very successful, and his energy and judicious management have aided him in the accumulation of his property.
In his religious belief, Mr. Bouscher is identified with the Lutheran Church, in all the good works of which he is an active worker. He was deeply bereaved when, on the 18th of February, 1882, his wife was called from earth. During all the years of their wedded life, she was his helpmate and devoted counselor, and in her demise the family suffered a deep loss. As a citizen, Mr. Bouscher has ever favored all public-spirited measures, and perhaps no resident of Somerset Township has contributed more liberally to its development than has he. In politics Mr. Bouscher is a stanch Republican.

Extracted 22 Sep 2016 by Norma Hass from Portrait and Biographical Record of Randolph, Jackson, Perry and Monroe Counties, Illinois, published in 1894, pages 462-463.

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