Biography - David Ohlwine

DAVID OHLWINE, a well-known resident of Red Bud, and one worthy of representation in the history of Randolph County among its prominent citizens, claims Ohio as the place of his nativity. He was born in Greene County, and is a son of Charles and Elizabeth (Schroeder) Ohlwine, who were natives of Maryland. The father served in the War of 1812, and the family was probably founded in America during Colonial days.
In the Buckeye State, David Ohlwine was reared to manhood, no event of special importance occurring during his boyhood and youth. The common schools afforded him his educational privileges. After arriving at man's estate, he was united in marriage with Miss Charlotte Taylor. Their wedding was celebrated in Ohio, and in 1839 they left that state for Illinois. The first year after their arrival was spent in Preston. Mr. Ohlwine purchased eighty acres of land and began farming, but on account of sickness he was forced to incur indebtedness, and during the earlier years of his residence in this state he met with many hardships and difficulties, but at length perseverance and industry overcame these, and by good management and well directed efforts he achieved a handsome property, becoming an extensive land owner in Randolph and Richland Counties.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ohlwine were born eleven children, six of whom are yet living, namely: Clementine, wife of W. R. Kelsey, of San Antonio, Tex.; Walter; George; James, who resides in South Dakota; Frank, a resident of Kendallville, Ind.; and Cora, wife of Charles A. Wolfe, who is living in Ligonier, Ind. The mother of this family, who was a faithful member of the Baptist Church, died April 6, 1891. For his second wife Mr. Ohlwine chose Mrs. Cordelia Allen, widow of James Allen, and a daughter of Nathaniel Smith, one of the early settlers of Randolph County.
In connection with his farming interests, Mr. Ohlwine was one of the originators of the Ohlwine-Schrieber Banking Company, and has filled the office of President since its formation. The success of that financial institution is due to his efforts. He has been one of the active and leading business men of the county, and as the result of his untiring efforts has won the prosperity which now enables him to lay aside business cares. He was at one time a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In politics, he is a supporter of Democratic principles, and in religious belief is a Baptist. He may truly be called a self-made man, and his life is in many respects well worthy of emulation.

Extracted from Portrait and Biographical Record of Randolph, Jackson, Perry and Monroe Counties, Illinois, published in 1894, page 424.

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